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VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

Today's Fire Service

     The fire service of today is one of the most diverse and challenging professions. ╩It is that diversity that inspires men and women to enter the fire service both as career and volunteer employees. ╩The firefighter of the 90's is trained to extinguish fires, provide emergency medical care, respond to hazardous materials spills, and other emergencies. ╩Firefighters provide these services no matter what the time of day, how inclement the weather, or how hazardous, stressful, or emotional the situation is. ╩Being a volunteer firefighter is not for everyone, it is not for the meek or timid or for those who lose control of their emotions in time of crises. ╩Today's fire fighter needs more than just a desire to help others. ╩You also need courage and dedication, assertiveness and a willingness to learn new skills and face new challenges. ╩The work is hot, sweaty, dirty, and strenuous, and you will perform it under all kinds of conditions. ╩It is a job that will bring you in contact with people in emergency situations. ╩You will experience the whole range of human emotions and responses, and you will be trained to respond to them calmly. ╩Firefighters at Evans Valley Fire Dist. #6 primarily respond to provide fire suppression and emergency medical service. ╩District apparatus respond to structure fires in single and multiple family dwellings, business, farm and schools.
     Other incidents include vehicle accidents, aircraft crashes, hazardous materials spills, structure collapse and cave - ins.
     The Fire District also conducts fire and life safety programs for our schools.
     Being a volunteer firefighter is not all saving lives and running calls. ╩There are various station duties, such as building and apparatus maintenance and public events. Many hours are spent in training and practice to keep you ready for duty. We also have a variety of activities for you and your family to enjoy with our Fire District family.
     Below are questions often asked about Evans Valley Fire District #6 Volunteer Firefighter Program. Please read this and if you have any more questions, please feel free to contact our office at (541) 582-0678, or email us at Info@EVFire.org.

WHAT CAN I GET OUT OF BEING A VOLUNTEER?

     Some people get satisfaction from helping others, some are looking for the experience to help improve their skills for possible future employment as a career firefighter with a career agency. Either way, Evans Valley Fire District #6 can get you started in any direction you choose in the fire service. You many not receive much money, however, there are other benefits. All members are covered by a $20,000 Accidental Death and Dismemberment Policy. All members are offered an excellent opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job training and experience. All members receive quarterly fuel reimbursement checks with various amounts depending upon their activity during the previous quarter.

WHAT IF I HAVE NO EXPERIENCE?

     Initially the training requirements are quite extreme. The reason for this is so that all of the basic requirements are met. Once the initial training requirements are met, it is up to the individual person as to how much more additional training they want to get besides the weekly drills. The basic requirements are:
     Fire Fighter 1 Academy (85 hours)
     CPR (8 hours)
     S130/S190 - Basic Wildland Training (32 hours)

     Encouraged additional training.
          First Responder (45 hours)
          Emergency Medical Technician (160 + hours)
          S215, Wildand Interface Firefighter (32 hours)
          Basic Driver / Wildland Engine Operator (16 hours)
          Pumper Operator (32 hours)
          Water Supply Operations (16 hours)
          Hazardous Materials Operations (16 hours)
          ...the list goes on and on...

DO I HAVE TO BUY ANYTHING?

     The district provides all of the basic personal protective equipment needed to fight fires except for 8" boots, which are needed to fight wildland fires. After passing the probationary period, you will be issued a uniform shirt.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS?

     You must be 16 to 17 to be a part of the Junior Firefighter Program.
     You must be 18 or over to be a volunteer firefighter.
     Ability to pass a physical agility test and an oral interview.
     Valid Oregon Drivers License.
     Be self motivating and a team player.

WHAT IS THE JUNIOR FIREFIGHTER PROGRAM?

     This program is for individuals who are between the ages of 16 and 18. A junior firefighter is allowed to do many support services during emergencies, however, they are not allowed to climb ladders, fight interior structural fires, drive emergency apparatus, or run power equipment. (There may be other issues not listed here.)

WHAT IF I WANT TO BE AN EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN ONLY?

     There are several people in the district who have no desire to fight fires. Their primary duties are to provide medical attention during medical related alarms and to provide support services during fire alarms. They are required to attend a Hazardous Materials Awareness Training class (8 hours).

CITIZEN TENDER OPERATOR PROGRAM

     We have recently added some additional positions that may be filled by people who may not wish to fight fire but still wish to do something for their community. Our Citizen Tender Operator program is designed to have people with a Commercial Drivers License or previous fire fighting experience to drive and operate our water tenders. These folks would be expected to attend district training when the emphasis is on water evolutions.

WHEN DO I GET A RADIO?

     A volunteer is not issued an actual radio. They are issued a voice pager after attending the Firefighter Academy, the CPR Training, and receives approval from the Officers.

WHEN DO I GET TO DRIVE?

     A volunteer must be 18 years of age or older to drive emergency apparatus. After a volunteer has completed all of the basic training requirements and has been released from the probationary period, drivers training may begin.

HOW LONG IS PROBATION?

     Typically, probation lasts for approximately 6 - 12 months. A volunteer's probationary period usually ends after all of their basic training requirements are met and it is approved by the Training Officer and the Fire Chief.

HOW MUCH TIME WILL THIS TAKE ME?

     The initial Firefighter 1 Course, Orientation, CPR and Basic Wildland Suppression Training takes 8 weekends (typically not all at the same time) to complete. After completing your basic recruit requirements, your status will be reviewed. Upon successful review, you will be released to start responding to alarms. After you have completed Orientation and have started the Firefighter 1 Academy, you will be able to attend training, which is every Tuesday night 6:30 pm until 9:00 pm.

STATISTICAL INFORMATION

>     Evans Valley Fire District #6 responded to 341 alarms in 2006. The majority of the alarms are medical emergencies and motor vehicle accidents. The district is very dependent on its volunteers. During the weekday, the fire station is staffed with 2 paid personnel whose primary job function is administrative. Both are trained in fire suppression and are Emergency Medical Technicians. During the summer, another fire fighter is hired temporarily to assist with the increased call volume of wildland fires.

WHAT CHANCE DO I HAVE FOR A FIRE SERVICE CAREER?

     As stated above, Evans Valley Fire District #6 is very dependent on its volunteers. The 2 paid positions are positions that require years of both experience and education. The level an individual may strive for is basically controlled by self motivation and we have the great effort to prepare people for future employment with career agencies. To be eligible for a career position, an associates degree in Fire Science is desirable along with certification as an Emergency Medical Technician in the State of Oregon. The testing process may include a written exam, a physical agility test and an oral interview. Most agencies do it the same way with minor differences.

VOLUNTEER BENEFITS

     Beside doing a good job for the local community, the volunteers do receive a little token for their efforts. Each quarter, the Evans Valley Fire District distributes fuel reimbursment checks. The amount will vary depending on the number of alarms and drills attended during the previous quarter. The district also pays for a life insurance package. If you die accidentally, your family will receive $20,000.

SOCIAL FUNCTIONS

     Every year there are 2 functions that are held in honor of the district volunteers. In April, we have our annual awards banquet. This is where various volunteers are given awards for their outstanding effort and contributions during the previous year. Everyone brings family and friends for a great Tri Tip barbecue and lots of fun. In December, we have our annual Christmas party. This is a great time to see everyone, meet new folks and share in the holiday cheer.

DISTRICT BOUNDARY:

     We cover 26 square miles with about 4500 residents
     MAP PAGE

WHAT DO I HAVE TO DO TO GET STARTED?

     ╩You start by filling out an APPLICATION and turning it in at our Fire Station at 8677 E. Evans Creek Rd. We do our recruiting in conjunction with scheduled Recruit Academies. We review applications for potential candidates and make academy selections based on an applicants eligibility, oral interview and physical abilities.

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